Let Them Eat Kale

Fledgling foodie crushing hard on Michael Pollan

Real Americans Eat Real American Produce

Check out today’s column from the always swoon-worthy Mark Bittman, on how local food is not an elitist plot, but rather, should be considered part of the “Made in America” ideal we appear to voraciously desire these days…in all other realms but food.

Of course, I’m biased here, but Bittman — and his “foodie’s porn” column — has a point. How can we continue to talk about jobs ad nauseam, while importing “Peruvian asparagus, Canadian tomatoes, South African apples, Dutch peppers and Mexican broccoli?” Sure, a global economy is a healthy one and we can’t realistically close our borders to all food imports (particularly to our friendly neighbors to the North…said the Canadian), but a locally-sourced carrot in your salad from the farmer’s market in town is also conducive to a productive, thriving economy here in the US of A. With Farm Bill negotiations coming up, this is one to read, folks.

Emily Dickinson: American Poet and Baking Enthusiast

Here ye, here ye, let it be known that I am a closeted American history dork. I also harbor a passionate love of baking. Enter Emily Dickinson and her scrumptious coconut cake recipe. My two worlds have officially collided, bringing my level of gleeful geekiness to an all time high. Why yes I’ll be making this, this weekend, thanks for asking.

 

Bangers & Mash and All Things Nice

As most womankind, I have an affinity for Brits – men, that is – particularly those with beards, if I’m going to be completely honest. Their self-deprecating humor and unpretentious use of “brilliant,” their adorably floppy hair and unapologetic fondness for scarves, East London hipsters, it just does it for me. And if they can cook, well clear your schedule good sir, because we be stayin’ home tonight. Enter Jamie Oliver, England’s favorite celebrichef and healthy food advocate. I wouldn’t exactly say “Is that a mullet?” Oliver sets my little heart a flutter, but what he stands for and the awe-inspiring work he’s doing in bringing the fight against childhood obesity to the forefront makes me swoon.

I stumbled across his TED award speech from last year, which I thought I would share – if nothing else but because he’s fun to listen to and dumps a wheelbarrow full of sugar cubes on the stage.

If seeing children struggling with obesity before the first grade, a class full of students unable to identify cauliflower and Jamie’s plaid shirt spark your interest, I would encourage you to check out Jamie Oliver’s Food Revolution. There are some yummy nuggets on here to learn more about his work and how to get involved in your own little corner of the world.

Next stop: how to start using words like “major” and “advert” without sounding like a total beezy (read: Anne Hathaway in One Day)

Today’s soundtrack. Van Morrison is a golden god. (Forgive the silly, though slightly memorizing video)

It’s a hard road daddy-o.

My personal financial advice is 25 cents, because everyone can afford it. Even if your allowance is $1, you will be able to afford four glasses. Also, you can make a classy combo with Oreos, or do three glasses for 50 cents.

Sam Schiller, age 10, on how to run a successful lemonade stand in the Big Apple.

Working the Squeeze, How City Kids Run Their Lemonade StandsNew York Magazine

Classy lady, this one.

Classy lady, this one.

Ben Howard: delightful English singer-song writer, maker-of-Mondays.

Subscription services are joining pop-up restaurants and underground markets as the hottest foodie trends at the moment. Here’s a nice little Trendcentral list of some of the latest mail order heath food programs, delivering organic and artisan foods “that are as good for eaters’ well-being as they are tasty.”

Subscription services are joining pop-up restaurants and underground markets as the hottest foodie trends at the moment. Here’s a nice little Trendcentral list of some of the latest mail order heath food programs, delivering organic and artisan foods “that are as good for eaters’ well-being as they are tasty.”

News of the first urban forest had the hearts of Seattleites and foodies everywhere going pitter-patter this week. Be rest assured, I will definitely be foraging there in the near future. The question is, how will they regulate it to ensure everyone is getting a fair share? And if they regulate it, will that undermine its purpose?

News of the first urban forest had the hearts of Seattleites and foodies everywhere going pitter-patter this week. Be rest assured, I will definitely be foraging there in the near future. The question is, how will they regulate it to ensure everyone is getting a fair share? And if they regulate it, will that undermine its purpose?